painting blues

There aren’t many colours I really detest, and so when I inadvertently buy paint that is one of those undesirables….there really is a lot of swearing around here. The sticker said Ultramarine Blue and it looked like a lovely smart navy, but this was the result. To me, this is royal blue and I’ve always steered clear of it.

bench 2

Like the professional I am, I realised it would be a good idea to finish the first vile coat completely but, while it was still drying, I’d already mixed in lots of white and a bit of grey to come up with a much more acceptable shade of sky blue:

bench 4

blue chair

Phew.  And in case you’re wondering why the bench is blocking the front door, it’s because part of my oregon pine floors and the joists in the entrance have gone vrot (vrot = rotten to the point of disintegration = flooring specialist to examine and give quote to repair = major bloody expense!) so, for safety’s sake, the French doors are being used instead.

I’ve also been painting inside the house, to very pleasing results. Pics to follow :)

 

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Seven years of NPOW

WordPress has just wished me a happy birthday – I’ve been doing this for seven years. With my history, that qualifies as a pretty long relationship! No itch is registering, I’m just going through a sort of interval period. Since the Christmas markets ended, I’ve been catching up on things around the house and garden that have needed attention, and given myself lots of time off for embroidery, reading, snoozing, resting, shopping, personal sewing, etc.

Patio stuff: recovered the cushions on Philip’s old wicker chairs, sorted out my cuttings, hung up hanging baskets, general tidy-up:wicker chairspatio

Treated myself to some new indoor plants:plant 2plant 1

Hung a sweet little hanging shelf thing over the mantelpiece for the Angel Wings to rest on, and stitched a tiny William Morris design for the rustic frame I got on sale for R100 in Kleinmond:mantelpiececross stitch

I’m still working on the large cross-stitch design that I started about 13 years ago. I wish I could remember the name of the designer, I’ll have to go back to the library and see if the book is still there.

cross stitch 2.jpg

It’s nearly finished and, once it is, it’ll be time to get down to some proper work. I have a Big Plan for the coming year, watch this space.

Happy 2019 to all of you! I hope it will be filled with as much creativity, satisfaction, energy and contentment as you can handle :)

ScrapHappy November

My little denim market bag has become old and shabby.  I need to have room for cash, cell phone and parking ticket – three things you never want to lose touch with when you’re busy and distracted at a market. I also like to wear it as a crossbody because it’s too easy for it to slip off if it’s just over one shoulder. Goodbye, tired old friend.

market bag old

Hello, sweet and pretty new patchwork buddy!

market bag 2

Except for the blue lace, these bits were all leftovers from cushions and bedspreads. The back is old denim from a pair of jeans that are happily now far too big for me to wear, with an extra pocket for luck.

Have a look at other ScrapHappy stories, all inspired by Kate at Tall Tales from Chiconia

still with the chair thing

After the success with this one, I moved on to the four dining chairs with drop-in seats (the two chairs that go at each end of the table are made in a different style but the seats didn’t need recovering anyway). They have/had pretty needlepoint seat covers but they’re getting shabby, plus I was still looking for things to STAPLE with the GUN.

Before:

dining Before

After:

 

dining 4

dining 3

An aside: I decided not to remove the original needlepoint covers before recovering with the patchwork, although this is obviously what a professional would have done. There may be a time when these chairs will go and live somewhere else, in which case my fabric can easily be removed. There’s no way that undeserving people will get to enjoy my pretty patchwork stripes and labour (long story,  beyond the scope of this blog post)…

I know I shouldn’t boast but I really really love how these turned out :)

sitting pretty

When you’re always so busy making stuff to sell, sometimes it feels like pure indulgence to spend time making something for your very own self. That’s how it is for me, at least.

chair 1

Sorting out the things that got shoved into the spare bedroom, I unearthed this old teak chair that used to be in my shop. Inspired by ideas on pinterest, I gave it a quick make-over with some patchwork squares and a staple gun. Honestly, it took me less than 45 minutes to sew and recover the seat. Great satisfaction!

chair 2

PS. So many of you have sent me personal emails lately – thank you. Even if I haven’t replied to each one, please know that they have all been read with gratitude and have touched my heart.

ScrapHappy cushion cover

I’ve been in neutral for what feels like a long time now but am slowly getting back into gear – first gear still, but moving up to second… I’m sure eventually I’ll be back to normal, or at least whatever passes for normal with me :)

circle

I came across a round cushion I’d made ages ago from left-over bits of fabric that never really worked: the diameter was completely off, it was too small and, once stuffed, it was like a rugby ball. I still like the colours so decided to unpick the whole thing and figure out a way to make it bigger. I wanted to somehow drop it into a bigger piece of fabric but without having to applique the edges. I gave it some thought and also checked on the internet to make sure I was heading in the right direction: this tutorial by Angela Pingel helped a lot. It’ll now become a cushion about 45cm square, a goodly size. The background fabric isn’t technically a scrap but I’m sure the patchwork pie will count as “scraphappy”!

I’ve been inspired to write this by Kate, who provides links to other ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month. It’s a marvellous nudge to creativity to see what other people do with their imaginations and sewing skills.