Tag Archives: diy

how to make a fabric infinity scarf (in less than 15 mins)

Here’s a dead easy something to make. All you need is some fabric, needle and thread. I used my sewing machine as well, but if you’re Amish you can stitch it by hand.

I used:
3 pieces of fabric – two were 13cm wide and one was 16cm wide, but they all need to be the same length: 180cm.

cowl 2

1. With right sides facing, and with a 1cm seam allowance, sew the long sides of the pieces together. All of them.

cowl 4

2. You’ll end up with a tube.

cowl 6

3.  Push your arm through the tube…

cowl 7

4. … and pull the end of it through to the top.

cowl 8

5. With right sides together, you’re going to sew the raw edges together, leaving a 10 to 12 cm gap.  (You haven’t turned the tube inside out yet).  It’ll look like this (the arrows are to show you where I left the gap):

cowl 9

6. Pull the cowl through the gap in the seam til it’s all right side out.  Slip stitch the seam closed.  Give it a light press, and it’s done!

cowl 12

At this length, and especially if you’ve used stretchy t-shirty fabric, you should easily be able to get it round your neck three times, if you want to. I generally wrap mine round twice, but you can also fold it in half and pull one side through the loop for a different look.

cowl 20 cowl 17

cowl 13  cowl 12

and if for some reason you don’t want anyone to know it’s you, you can flip one loop over your hair and smack on some sun gogs…. 

cowl 21

Back soon x
PS. I’m not sure about this new blog theme. Any comments?

BonBon update

I attended a fabulous sector meeting about (a) upcycling, and (b) e-commerce at the Cape Craft and Design Institute this afternoon, and worked on the cotton BonBon at the same time. Yip, two hours of uninterrupted crochet. hoo ha.

I have now worked 20.5 cm from the top of the crown and it looks like this:

cotton bonbon 2

And on my head it looks like this:

cotton bonbon 1

I think I’m going to work about another 5cm before starting the brim because I want more of a hang to it at the back. (Hats that hug my head do not suit me. It’s why I can’t ever wear a beanie. I get that whole pinhead look).

It’s weighing in now at 145g, so already it weighs as much as a fully completed acrylic BonBon like the one below.

green bonbon

Please bear this in mind if you’re going to try your hand at one – if you choose cotton over acrylic, you will use more meterage and it will weigh more.

Also, keep trying it on as you go, to make sure it’s taking on the shape you want – you don’t want it taking on too much of a life of its own!!!

How to make a BonBon

Hello. Long time no me. Crummy time management skills, I know.

So, as I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted, I want to share with you how Eunice has taught me to make the BonBons.

But first –  please be advised : this is not a pattern for the faint-hearted or those who need instant gratification! This is a pattern for those of you who like to throw a bit of caution to the wind, to be adventurous, who do not stress over the exact number of stitches or any precise dimensions, and who can spend more than two evenings working on it.  This is a wing-it kind of a thing (exactly how I make lasagne, come to think of it!) It’s not a problem for me that no two are exactly the same because I sell them, so there is always someone who wants one slightly bigger, slightly smaller, slightly rounder, slightly longer, with a pompom, without a pompom, whatever.

caramel bonbon

The caramel one above was made by Eunice, using Elle Pure Gold DK (acrylic) and a 4mm hook.
The green one below was made by me with the same yarn and hook, but my tension is much looser than Eunice’s.  I also had more stitches so I have a fatter hat with less shaping at the brim.

bonbon4

I’ve just started one using Elle Cotton On DK and a 4.5mm hook. There’s a lot less stretch with cotton, so I’m working more stitches in the round so that I don’t end up with a long, narrow hat that would only fit a long, narrow gnome. It looks like this so far:

cotton bonbon

The first section is the circle for the crown. (I’m using British terminology).

Ch 5. Sl st to make a circle. Ch 2 (does not count as tr), 13 tr into circle. Join to top of first tr.

Row 2:  Ch 2, 2 tr into same st, and in each st all round = 26 tr. Join with a sl st.

Row 3:  Ch 2, tr into same st, 1 tr into next, 2 tr into next, continue all round. Join with a sl st  (39 tr). That is your flat crown part.

NOTE: At this point, it would be useful to count the number of sts, so that if you want to make another BonBon the same, or smaller, or bigger, this will be your guide. (Eunice says she never counts, she just seems to know by instinct when it’s right.)

The second part is the main textured section. This is much much easier than it sounds. Basically, it’s all worked in front post trebles and back post trebles**  so that you get a lovely up-and-down texture.

Row 4:  Ch 2, 1 bptr (back post treble) into same st, 2 fptr (front post treble) into the next st.  Continue with the 1 bptr and 2 fptr all the way round, join with a sl st.

Row 5 – 8: Same as Row 4, but  work the bptr into the bptr of the previous row, and the 2 fptr into the second fptr of the previous row. Continue with the bptr and 2 fptr all the way round, join with a sl st.

Row 9:  Same as Row 8 but you need to do a bit of increasing here: to increase, work your 1 bptr as usual, then work 2 fptr into the first of the fptr of the previous row; work 1 bptr into the second of the fptr of the previous row, then work 2 fptr into the same stitch.  This will give you an increase that looks like this:

bonbon2

Eunice makes about 6 increases evenly spaced around this row.

Now you just carry on crocheting merrily away until your BonBon is about the size you want it to be from crown to brim, excluding the brim (which you may want to wear flipped over anyway).

Note:  I did a couple more increases in about Row 11 of the cotton one pictured above because, as I said, I wanted to accommodate the lack of stretch.  It all depends on the yarn you’re using and how big you want the hat to be.

When you’re not increasing, and you’re just going round and round, you’ll start to see the dome shape form.

Work until the hat measures about 22cm in length from the very top (or less, or more, up to you).

Brim:

Eunice’s brim is simply 5 or 6cm of front post trebles all around. With my green BonBon, I felt the brim looked like it was going to be too wide, so I first worked two rows of double crochet decreasing six times evenly in each row.  Then I did 5 rows of fptr.  End off and weave your ends in.

When you fold the brim over, you get a lovely contrast with the direction of the stitches.

I sold a lot of BonBons on Sunday at the Kirstenbosch Craft Market. Some girls wore a deep brim, some a narrow one, some had no brim.  It’s a pretty versatile hat.  One very stylish and charming lady of 72 has ordered one in dark brown that she is going to wear in a totally different way, that I had never thought of before.  I’ll show you that next time :)

Now, if these instructions really stink, please let me know – I’ve gone over and over them, but I may have made an error or overlooked something.  Fingers crossed not…

** front post and back post trebles

Back (sometime) soon x

novelty yarn – quick and easy

It’s hard to resist a new novelty yarn.  I know I can’t, I wouldn’t even waste an splurt of energy on trying.  I’d had an order for some men’s slouchies in various shades of grey (not a colour I generally keep at home), so I popped in to Roger at Orion to stock up on the weekend.  And there was a new delivery of yarn, not even unpacked yet… yum…

baltic baltic 3

It’s called Elle Baltic and it comes from Saprotex in East London (E L on the South African coast in the Eastern Cape, that is).  Roger had two colours so I grabbed the one with pinks and blues mixed up, called Potpourri. R40 for a 100g ball. As you can see, the yarn consists of two separate strands that are bridged at regular intervals. Makes for a very chunky look.

baltic 10

I used a  10mm hook and made a simple cowl.  Trebles seemed to work best, anything shorter and I think the stitch would have been too squished. I have no idea how many stitches I started with, nor how long it took, and I also know that it’s got a built-in twist because I really wasn’t paying attention (episode 7 of True Detective – who would take their eyes off Mr McConaughey, right?) – but I’m very happy with it.

baltic 1      baltic 9

Back soon x

cunning pompom technique

**This post is dedicated to my friend, M_______ L____, in Californ-ee-ay-a, without whom there wouldn’t be any pompoms at all!

So, I am now the proud owner of three different sizes of the Clover pompom maker.  I am extremely happy with them, and they each have names (which I won’t share with you, because it would just confirm what you may only suspect – that I’m a nutcase!).

One thing I wasn’t liking so much was that sometimes it was too easy to pull out a piece of yarn from the finished item, and I certainly didn’t want anyone buying a BonBon with a dodgy pompom. I think I wasn’t tying the yarn tightly enough around the centre, but even when I tied it so tightly that the thread almost snapped, it still bothered me. So now I do this:

When I’ve wrapped the first layer, ie. until you can’t see the plastic on the inner any more, I dot on some Stop Fray.

pompom1 pompom 5

pompom6 pompom7

pompom8

I use the Stop Fray about four times on each side, and also on the very last bit just before closing it up and tying.

pompom10

And because I live where I do, I am able to hang my pompoms in the sun to dry. (Sorry, northern hemispherers….)

I’ve also experimented with craft glue but that didn’t work as well as the Stop Fray. I know there are various fabric-type glues on the market and I once had something called Fray-Stoppa, which was a clear, runny glue, which I think would also have worked well.  Give it a bash with whatever you have lying around, and let me know what works for you.

I haven’t forgotten that I promised to give you the BonBon pattern, I am only halfway through the shocking pink one I’m making and want to finish it first so I can be sure that I’ve understood Eunice’s technique 100%.  Here is the beginning:

BonBon pink

Back soon x